Personal Safety

Fireworks: Here's what you need to know

Fireworks: Here’s what you need to know

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In recent years, Logansport’s Fourth of July fireworks display has taken place at Riverside Park. The view from Cole Bridge is breathtaking — though civilians generally are not allowed to view them from this vantage point without special permission. Rich Voorhees Fireworks: Here’s what you need to know City regulations permit personal use starting today From staff reports Jun 29, 2018
In recent years, Logansport’s Fourth of July fireworks display has taken place at Riverside Park. The view from Cole Bridge is breathtaking — though civilians generally are not allowed to view them from this vantage point without special permission. Rich Voorhees
It’s time to celebrate Independence Day with fun and fireworks shows. But residents may be unaware of the city of Logansport’s laws related to setting off your own fireworks. Here they are, as well as a few safety tips.
Logansport fireworks laws
Thinking about setting off your own fireworks? Today’s the day city ordinance starts permitting you to do that. Here’s what you need to know:
• City ordinance limits consumer fireworks use to the time period from 5 p.m. until two hours after sunset from June 29-July 3 and July 5-9. (Fireworks are also permitted 10 a.m. Dec. 31 until 1 a.m. Jan. 1)
• Fireworks may be used from 10 a.m. to midnight July 4.
• Using fireworks outside those time periods may result in a fine of $100 under the city ordinance.
• According to state law, fireworks can only be used on the user’s property, the property of someone who granted permission for fireworks to be discharged or a place designated by the Indiana State Fire Marshal.
• Outside city limits, areas are subject to fireworks time limits outlined by the state. Under state law, fireworks may only be discharged from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. any day except on Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day and New Year’s Eve. The time limits don’t apply to those four holidays.
• Someone 18 or older must be present when anyone younger than 18 is using or possessing fireworks.
• Only people 18 and older can buy fireworks, per state law.
Safety tips
An estimated 12,900 people suffered fireworks-related injuries last year, according to the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission, and 67 percent of those injuries happened during the month surrounding the Fourth of July. Moreover, sparklers were the No. 1 cause of the injuries, accounting for 14 percent of cases. Here’s some safety precautions the CPSC recommends:
• Do not allow young children to play with fireworks. Sparklers, a firework often considered by many to be the ideal “safe” device for the young, burn at very high temperatures and should be not be handled by young children. Children may not understand the danger involved with fireworks and may not act appropriately while using the devices or in case of emergency.
• Older children should be permitted to use fireworks only under close adult supervision. Do not allow any running or horseplay.
• Set off fireworks outdoors in a clear area, away from houses, dry leaves, or grass and other flammable materials.
• Keep a bucket of water nearby for emergencies and for pouring on fireworks that fail to ignite or explode.
• Do not try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks. Soak them with water and throw them away.
• Be sure other people are out of range before lighting fireworks.
• Never light fireworks in a container, especially a glass or metal container.
• Keep unused fireworks away from firing areas.
• Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.
• Check instructions for special storage directions.
• Never have any portion of your body directly over a firework while lighting.
• Do not experiment with homemade fireworks. React to this story:

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